diet

Simple Lifetime Diet

Posted on June 9, 2012. Filed under: cholesterol, diabetes, diet, high blood pressure | Tags: , , , , |

The Simple Lifetime Diet is a health-promoting diet for everyone. It encourages use of high fiber fruits, vegetables and whole grain foods as well as protein sources such as low-fat dairy products and lean meats such as chicken, turkey, fish and very lean cuts of pork and beef. This diet is especially beneficial for persons with diabetes, high blood pressure or blood fat abnormalities. Our research, summarized at andersonsimplediet.com, documents these benefits: prevention and reversing diabetes, lowering blood pressure, and “fixing” blood lipid derangements. The Green Light Calorie Guide guides you in daily intake of at least five servings of fruits and vegetables, three servings of whole grain cereal, bread, pasta or rice, two servings of low-fat dairy products and two three-ounce servings of lean meat such as chicken, turkey, fish or pork tenderloin. Eat to your heart’s content. Best, Nutdoc

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Preventing Diabetes. 2011 Update

Posted on March 31, 2011. Filed under: diabetes, diet, nutrition | Tags: , , , , |

Diabetes is the AIDs epidemic of  the 21st century and the US is not spared. 24 million Americans have diabetes and 70 million have prediabetes. Half of all Americans are destined to get diabetes unless they make important lifestyle changes. Most American adults who do not currently have diabetes can avoid it altogether or delay the onset for  10-20 years.

Previously I have blogged about diet (low fat, high fiber, high carbohydrate), getting back to a lean weight (like in high school for most women in or college for most men) and exercise (walking at least 30 minutes per day).  This posting will focus on Nutraceuticals (not pharma-ceuticals but nutra-ceuticals). Nutraceuticals are capsules or tablets you take, in addition to your healthy diet, to lower your risk of going on to develop diabetes.

These are the supplements I recommend for people who have a very strong family history of diabetes (more than one parent or sibling with diabetes), have a history of diabetes during pregnancy), or have been told that their blood glucose was ‘a little high.’ Magnesium,  300 millligrams (mg)/day; chromium 400 micrograms (ug)/day; vanadium 100 micrograms/day; and zinc 15 milligrams/day. These values are for the elemental magnesium, for example, and do not include the carbonate or oxide component.

These vitamins are recommended: folic acid, 400 micrograms/day; vitamin C, 1000 milligrams/day, and vitamin D, 100o units/d.

My supplement for diabetes prevention contains cinnamon, 1000 mg/day and I add cinnamon to my oatmeal each morning

In my 2008 diabetes book (see earlier blog) we identified 11 herbals that have diabetes protective effects. Most of the herbals have dozens of different chemicals and only a few of the chemicals have diabetes protective effects. My supplement (see below) include Banaba, Fenugreek, Gymnema and Salicia. Other herbals that appear useful are bitter melon, American or Korean Ginseng, and nopal or prickly pear. If you have a reliable source and the herbals are not too expensive, you may want to add these. The supplements I recommend are “Blood Sugar Support” from Advanced BioSolutions (drsinitra.com or 1-800-304-1708) or Depsyl (www.Depsyl.com). I have not connection to these suppliers and no financial interest.

Good luck. Paradoxically or providentially I have had prediabetes for 20 years and have maintained a plasma glucose values of under 100 mg/dl over this period using diet, exercise, weight management and the supplements outlined above. You can do the same!

Please post your comments and questions.

Best wishes.

Jim (nutdoc)

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Preventing Diabetes: New in 2009

Posted on March 4, 2009. Filed under: diabetes, diet, nutrition |

Diabetes is the AIDs epidemic of  the 21st century and the US is not spared. 24 million Americans have diabetes and 70 million have prediabetes. Half of all Americans are destined to get diabetes unless they make important lifestyle changes. Most American adults who do not currently have diabetes can avoid it altogether or delay the onset for  10-20 years.

Previously I have blogged about diet (low fat, high fiber), getting back to a lean weight (like in high school) and exercise (walking at least 30 minutes per day). Next Monday I am lecturing to Medical Students about Nutraceuticals and am updating my recommendations for persons at risk for diabetes and giving more details. This posting will focus on Nutraceuticals. Nutraceuticals are capsules or tablets you take, in addition to your healthy diet, to lower your risk of going on to develop diabetes.

These are the supplements I recommend for people who have a very strong family history of diabetes (more than one parent or sibling with diabetes), have a history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy), or have been told that their blood glucose was ‘a little high.’ Magnesium,  300 millligrams (mg)/day; chromium 400 micrograms (ug)/day; vanadium 100 micrograms/day; and zinc 15 milligrams/day. These values are for the elemental magnesium, for example, and do not include the carbonate or oxide component.

These vitamins are recommended: folic acid, 400 micrograms/day; vitamin C, 1000 milligrams/day, and vitamin D, 100o units/d.

My supplement for diabetes prevention contains cinnamon, 1000 mg/day and I add cinnamon to my oatmeal and soy-black beanchili. Daily I also have one small square of dark chocolate with 5 grams of cocoa.

In my 2008 diabetes book (see earlier blog) we identified 11 herbals that have diabetes protective effects. Most of the herbals have dozens of different chemicals and only a few of the chemicals have diabetes protective effects. Thus, I cannot recommend specific products. My supplement (see below) has Gymnema sylvestre 400 mg/day and Banaba extract, 3 mg/d. American ginseng or Korean ginseng also are protective but I cannot recommend a specific supplier. Other herbals that appear useful are bitter melon (Momordica charantia), fenugreek, American or Korean Ginseng, and nopal or prickly pear (opuntia streptacantha). If you have a reliable source and the herbals are not too .expensive, you may want to add -these. The supplement I recommend is “Blood Sugar Support” from Advanced BioSolutions (drsinitra.com or 1-800-304-1708). I have not connection to this supplier and no financial interest.

Good luck. Paradoxically or providentially I have had prediabetes for 6 years and have maintained a plasma glucose values of 98-105 mg/dl over this period using diet, exercise, weight management and the supplements outlined above. You can do the same!

Please post your comments and questions. I have trouble keeping up with my e-mail but will try to be more active on this blog site.

Best wishes.

Jim (nutdoc)

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Diabetes Book Availability

Posted on September 12, 2008. Filed under: diabetes, diet, nutrition, obesity, weight |

Dear friends,

Thank you for your comments related to my diabetes book. Unfortunately technical books, like textbooks, are expensive because the market is small. Maybe your public library could purchase one. Amazon.com carries our book, search for Pasupuleti, V, the first author. Sometimes good deals are available though them.

Please send me your questions as comments and I will try to answer them specificallly.

In a few words, if you are at risk for diabetes (strong family history, history of gestational diabetes, have a borderline blood glucose) these are things you can do. Most important, try to get down to your desirable weight (a BMI under 25- many websites help you calculate your BMI). Walk 30-45 minutes six days a week. Cut down on your intake of fat, especially red meat, all beef, pork and dark meat. Increase your intake of fiber from whole grain breads, cereals and beans. Take the supplements (magnesium, chromium, vanadium) described in my earlier Post.

Thanks and good luck.

Jim

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What is LDL cholesterol?

Posted on August 11, 2008. Filed under: cholesterol, diet, nutrition | Tags: , , , , |

Recently a journalist asked me to explain the different forms of cholesterol. Sometimes explaining the cholesterol number is time consuming and health care professionals only mention the total cholesterol. I try to explain to my patients these numbers and goals.
The LDL ‘bad guy’ cholesterol is the most deadly form and a desirable number in less than 130 mg/dl and an ideal number is less than 100.
The HDL ‘good guy’ cholesterol is protective from heart attack and higher is better. Desirable for women is 50 or higher and for men is 40 or higher. A 60 mg/dl HDL number is ideal and protective. If the HDL number is more than half of the LDL number your probably are protected and in good shape.
Triglycerides, the other blood fat, should be lower than 150 mg/dl.
What is a good ratio?
An ideal LDL/HDL ratio for women is 100/55 or 1.8 while the ideal for men is 100/45 or 2.2. The lower the ratio the better.
How can I improve my cholesterol numbers?Smoking increases risk of heart attack and lowers HDL. Exercise increases the HDL.
To decrease LDL, diet is the answer. Lose weight to desirable weight, mimimize animal fat intake (red meat, cheese, butter), increase fiber intake from whole grains, fruits, vegetables, oat cereals. Soy protein, two servings per day from soy milk, edamame, soy nuts, or tofu lower cholesterol. Psyllium fiber supplements are ways for busy people to get in their soluble fiber. I recommend oat cereal for breakfast, 4 psyllium capsules with lunch and four with dinner.
Why is high cholesterol so bad? High cholesterol levels increase risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure and circulation problems. The same habits that raise the cholesterol also bring on diabetes prematurely.
Is it OK to eat eggs? Eggs are a concentrated from of cholesterol in the diet that I recommend avoiding altogether. Egg substitutes make good omeletes and go into recipes. Even if your LDL cholesterol is low, eating eggs increase your risk for heart attack and stroke.
In a nutshell, what are your recommendations?  The major things that affect LDL cholesterol are genes and diet. You can’t change your genes but most people can lower their LDL cholesterol by 30 to 70 points through diet, weight loss and exercise. Weight loss can lower the LDL by 20% (30 points) and raise the HDL by 10-25% (5-15 points). Exercise can raise the HDL by 25-50% (10-30 points). The diet to lower LDL cholesterol is low in animal fat (avoid the yellow death– eggs, butter, cheese), minmize intake of red meat, sausage, pork bacon, high fat dairy (full fat milk, ice cream) and excessive oil of any form (in salads, in cooking). Olive oil is very high in calories and should be used sparing. Be sure to get in three servings of whole grains, at least five servings of fruit or vegetables, and soluble fiber from oat products or psyllium fiber supplements.

 

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Reactive hypoglycemia

Posted on May 20, 2008. Filed under: 1, diet, diet, nutrition, weight | Tags: |

Recently a young lady e-mailed me about the management of reactive hypoglycemia. This condition causes the blood glucose to drop to low levels between meals and cause weakness or shakiness. We have been doing research on this for many years and have successfully treated many dozens of people. Here are some caveats. It is not necessary to have a glucose tolerance test– I obtained a hemoglobin A1c to confirm low blood glucose. The hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) gives an estimated average of the blood glucose over the last 6 weeks. If a person has been having low blood glucose values between meals the HbA1c values is a few tenths of a point below the normal range.

Usual causes: diabetes in the familly and a tendency to diabetes; previous stomach surgery of a stomach that empties too fast; and idiopathic (meaning we don’t know exactly why). Rare causes are an underactive adrenal gland or pituitary gland.

Diet and exercise are the best and most effective treatment. High fiber foods– like oatmeal, beans, whole grain products– and starchy foods– rice, pasta, potatoes– work very well. Soy foods like edamame, tofu, soy nuts, and soy milk also help. Initially people need to avoid sugar, sweets, and fruit. However, after a few weeks people can resume using whole fruit but not fruit juice. Raisins are a good snack between meals. Avoid high fat animal products such as sausage, bacon, high fat beef and pork and select white meat of chicken or turkey for protein choices.

Since a tendency towards diabetes is present in about half of US adults the above diet, exercise and, if overweight, getting to a healthy weight are very helpful.  

Like many conditions, your health is in your hands. Best wishes.

Jim (NutDoc)

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Diabetes Prevention

Posted on February 4, 2008. Filed under: diabetes, diet, nutrition | Tags: , , |

The diabetes that most adults have (adult-onset or Type 2 diabetes) is largely preventable. With good lifestyle practices most individuals, even though they have the genes for diabetes, can avoid developing this troublesome disease.

Diabetes prevention has been a focus of my research for 40 years. These comments come from observations made by my research team and by others.

Three things are important:

  1. Weight management. About 80% of Type 2 diabetes can be attributed to overweight. To minimize risk for diabetes the body weight should be about what most people weighed in high school of a BMI of less that 25. BMI calculator at www.mypyramid.gov. Cutting back on fatty foods and sugar overload coupled with walking 2 miles daily are very important protective practices.
  2. Healthy eating. A high carbohydrate and fiber intake is protective. Persons who eat our HCF diet (see www.hcf-nutrition.org) have a 30% lower risk of developing diabetes. People who are addicted to beef, pork and other red meats have a 36% higher risk for developing diabetes. Whole grain products (three servings per day) and soy protein (two servings) per day are important protectors.
  3. Nutrition supplements. Certain supplements appear to have diabetes preventive properties. Providentially and paradoxically I have pre-diabetes. Without changing a healthy plant-base diet or walking 3 miles per day, taking these supplements lowered my fasting glucose value from 118 (pre-diabetes) to 99 (normal). These are what I recommend. I do not have any financial or other connection to these companies.

Ø      Magnesium 400 mg/day (very convincing evidence),

Ø      Alpha lipoic acid 200-300 mg/day (suggestive evidence),

Ø      Chromium 400 micrograms/day (suggestive evidence),

Ø      Vanadium 100 micrograms/day (suggestive evidence),

Ø      Cinnamon powder 1000 mg/day (Not yet of proven value in humans but you can use to enhance many foods you serve.)

            My first choice: Blood Glucose Support*: 2 capsules twice daily

1-800-304-1708 www.drsinatra.com

*I am not certain that Gymnema or Banaba extracts are of value but they probably are not harmful.

So, if diabetes runs in your family or you have a ‘touch of sugar’ you may want to do these preventive things. They have worked for me and for many of my patients.

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