FISH FOR HEALTH

Posted on August 9, 2012. Filed under: heart disease, nutrition | Tags: , , , , , |

Fish is one of our healthiest choices for protein. Consumption of fish or fish oil has major health protective effects including these: decreased risk for cardiovascular disease (heart attack and stroke); preservation of cognitive thinking; and, probably, reduced risk for diabetes. Fish or fish oil intake also lowers blood triglyceride levels. Fish oils are omega-3 fatty acids that include DHA (decosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and ALA (alpha-linolenic acid). Flax seeds provide ALA but the health benefits of taking flax seeds alone are not well established. Early observations suggested that fish oil intake might increase risk for diabetes but later, more persuasive studies, indicates that fish oil intake decreases risk for diabetes. Having pre-diabetes myself for 14 years has led me to take fish oil capsules twice daily. Ideally, everyone should eat two servings of fish weekly. I recommend that all adults consume one capsule daily and seniors should consume one capsule twice daily.  I use two capsules of high-potency Fisol (VitaminShoppe.com) daily. We also enjoy salmon broiled on a cedar board. Delicious, enjoy. Nutdoc

 

1.   Balk EM, Lichtenstein AH, Chung M, Kupelnick B, Chew P, Lau J. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on serum markers of cardiovascular disease risk: A systematic review. Atherosclerosis 2006;189:19-30.

2.   Wang C, Harris WS, Chung M et al. n-3 Fatty acids from fish or fish-oil supplements, but not alpha-linolenic acid, benefit cardiovascular disease outcomes in primary- and secondary-prevention studies: a systematic review. Am J Clin Nutr 2006;84:5-17.

3.   Djousse L, Gaziano JM, Buring JE, Lee IM. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids and fish consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes. Am J Clin Nutr 2011;93:143-50.

4.   Nurk E, Drevon CA, Refsum H et al. Cognitive performance among the elderly and dietary fish intake: the Hordaland Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;86:1470-8.

 

 

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Your Health Is In Your Hands

Posted on November 12, 2011. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , |

You can prevent or reverse many health problems; it’s in your hands. Through health-promoting lifestyle habits you can reduce risk for virtually all common health problems by 50 to 80%. By lifestyle I mean: healthy diet, being fit, not smoking, proper sleep and stress management.
Mark Twain said, “The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d druther not.” But while having oatmeal, All Bran®, blackberries and blueberries with soy milk for breakfast every morning may not be my first choice, tastewise, it is my first choice, healthwise—and I enjoy it.
But good health practices can reduce risk for heart attacks, strokes, diabetes and cancers by more than 50%. Personally I want to maintain good health so I can enjoy life and my grandchildren!
Let’s start with some simple examples of health maintaining practices. From head to foot you can maintain your health.
• I have had several skin cancers on my face. When I am out in the sun for a few minutes I get red spots on my forehead if I don’t wear a hat. If I wear a hat and use sun screen, I don’t get red spots. I don’t want any more cutting on my face and x-ray treatment!
• About 20 yrs ago I developed a slight bunion on my left foot. I starting wearing a Dr. Scholl’s bunion pad on this foot and this problem has not progressed.
• Sinus trouble can largely be prevented. One winter 14 years ago I had three courses of antibiotics for recurrent sinus infections. I saw the an excellent ENT doctor and he recommended this plan: 1. Use Mucinex® twice daily, at bedtime and in AM. 2. Use saline nasal spray at night, two full squeezes for each nostril. 3. Use Afrin spray every morning when you start to get stuffy. I have not had to take an antibiotic for 14 years!
• Varicose veins can be managed without surgery. Thirty years ago varicose veins developed in my legs. I watched as my toes got purple from blood accumulation there. I saw the best vein surgeon in Lexington and he prescribed supportive elastic stockings (called Jobst stockings). I put these on every morning and take them off when I go to bed. My veins stabilized and the discoloration decreased. When I started going to the YMCA three days a week, at age 70, my varicose veins improved and the discoloration of my feet decreased further! As I built up the muscles in my legs, circulation improved.
These are trivial problems but they illustrate the point—our health is in our hands! In the following blogs I will discuss preventing and reversing more serious conditions.
Take care of your health!
Jim

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Soy and Women’s Health

Posted on January 10, 2010. Filed under: cancer, heart disease, menopause, osteoporosis, soy foods | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Soy foods are attractive for women who cannot or will not use hormone replacement therapy.  Evidence has been shown that soy food intake can have the following benefits for women:

  • Decreased risk for heart disease:  For more information, check out the blog, “Soy for your Heart.”
  • Decrease in menopausal symptoms
  • Protection from osteoporosis
  • Lower risk of breast cancer
  • Lower risk of death and breast cancer recurrence in breast cancer patients

Research has found soy foods useful to treat menopause symptoms.  The two major phytoestrogens found in soy, genistein and daidzein, have been shown to mimic the effects of estradiole (the major human female estrogen) and tamoxifen (an antiestrogen used to protect against the spread of breast cancer).  Genistein has a mix of antiestrogen and proestrogen effects that help reduce menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women and protect against osteoporosis.  Asian women have less osteoporosis than Western women even though the calcium intake of Asian women is lower; research suggests that this is due to the increased soy intake of Asian women.      

In addition, genistein has been shown to inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells in test tubes, and it slows the activity of several proteins that speed up tumor growth.  According to the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study that was recently published, women in China who had breast cancer and a higher intake of soy food had an associated lower risk of death and breast cancer recurrence.  The study concluded, “Soy food intake is safe and was associated with lower mortality and recurrence among breast cancer patients.”  The study suggests that intake of 11 grams per day of soy offers protective benefits for long-term health. 

For more information on breast health and the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study click on the following link:  http://www.soyconference.com/magazines/jan10.pdf  

So, enjoy soy milk on your cereal and in your coffee and tea.  Have soy nuts as a tasty snack or select an energy bar with soy protein.  Be chic and enjoy a healthy soy burger with all the trimmings.  The choices are out there and making a healthy choice will feel great.     

With Lacey Lamb

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